Has anyone used Neem oil?


cajunangi
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South Louisiana

Has anyone used Neem oil?

22 Feb '07 3:47 am
Ive been battling blackspot from hell. Has anyone used neem oil? Im doing some research on it cos Im tired of naked roses. Its wet in the morning here and wet at night here so I dont have much of a chance other than getting extremely disease resistant roses! when Im ordering new ones I have a tendancy to shun the black spot magnets. Soaker hoses wouldnt help because its the humidity here warm and wet. :?
May we all take the time to stop and smell the roses..if we dont then why do we grow them?
AngelaImage

Faith S
Perpetually learning gardener
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Alabama, USA

Blackspot

23 Feb '07 4:24 am
Hi Angie, I have not personally used Neem oil, but I have heard it works. There is something I learned the other night from a speaker at my local garden club that I am very anxious to try. This speaker is an expert in compost and organic gardening. He claims that one of the best fungicides you can use is plain old cornmeal. Not the kind that has baking soda and flour added, but one that contains just finely ground corn. He explained that simple sugars (not like table sugar) are a natural fungicide and that he makes a liquid by mixing cornmeal with water and pours it over the foliage of his plants as well as adding cornmeal to the soil around the plants. He claims it works great on blackspot. I plan to give it a try this season. I figure it can't hurt and if it works I will feel so much more virtuous for having used an organic method.
Faith at Bide-a-Wee Farm, Alabama, USA

Come abide with me a wee while.

cajunangi
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South Louisiana

23 Feb '07 9:05 am
OOO what is the mixture? I'll try it! I agree it cant hurt. Im going to try it too. Lets compare notes. If it works I'll broadcast it to everyone I know!
May we all take the time to stop and smell the roses..if we dont then why do we grow them?
AngelaImage

Faith S
Perpetually learning gardener
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Alabama, USA

Cornmeal fungicide

24 Feb '07 3:29 am
Unfortunately, he wasn't too specific about the exact quantities. I did purchase a three CD set of his lectures where he supposedly shares a lot of his recipes for natural remedies. I will listen to it later and see if he give more specifics. I just figured, I would mix in enough to make it still liquid enough to pour over the foliage. I don't think it would work in a sprayer, unless you processed the cornmeal to a fine powder in a food processor. It might also be wise to use it immediately after mixing, because the meal might swell in the water and get sort of thick and glutinous.
Faith at Bide-a-Wee Farm, Alabama, USA

Come abide with me a wee while.

cajunangi
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South Louisiana

24 Feb '07 5:36 am
Im going to sprinkle some dry and try a mixture and see how it goes. I'll post my findings and we will compare notes. This will be a fun experiment. :)
May we all take the time to stop and smell the roses..if we dont then why do we grow them?
AngelaImage

Faith S
Perpetually learning gardener
User avatar
Alabama, USA

Cornmeal as a fungicide

26 Feb '07 4:35 am
Well, I listened to his CD and I must have misunderstood what he was saying at the meeting. Cornmeal is a natural fungicide, but he puts it on the soil around the plants. What he recommends as a fungicidal spray is a mixture of a couple of tablespoons of baking soda or powdered sulpher (either one) to a quart or so of water. This can be sprayed on the foliage. The cornmeal acts on the soil by jumpstarting the good mocrobes and fungi that actually devour the bad fungi in the soil. Make sense to you? He also says that seaweed tea is a good fungicide. He buys dried seaweed at Oriental grocery stores and mixes it into water and lets it steep for a couple of days before straining it and using a diluted mixture as a spray.

Good luck with your experiments. BTW he did say that Neem Oil was a good organic substitute for the non-organic sprays.

If you have trouble withf Japanese Beetles on your roses, he recommended making a tea with chewing tobacco and using a dilute of this tea as a spray. Tobacco is a very powerful pesticide, so be careful about spraying so you only get the target bugs. He says you should never use traps because they just attract more beetles to your garden; however, if you want to make a homemade trap you can fill a small can (like from soup) with some type of fermenting fruit (like fruit coctail). Put the small can inside a large can like from coffee and then fill the coffee can with soapy (dishwasher soap) water. Supposedly the beetles are attracted to the fermenting fruit, become enebriated and fall into the soapy water. They can't swim and the soap makes it impossible for them to climb out, so they drown. Don't know if this really works or not. I think it might attract wasps however, and they eat other insects.
Faith at Bide-a-Wee Farm, Alabama, USA

Come abide with me a wee while.

janbay
distinguished helper

neem oil

1 Mar '07 2:11 pm
I have used neem as a mix for my poodles as the humidity coursed a plague, i mixed it with couple of drops of t tree and lavender ,it has a weird smell it's mixed with vinegar to make it soluable so i imagine that would clear the black spot if nothing else got ride of the fleas

smithgerry
helper

Re: Has anyone used Neem oil?

30 Mar '10 10:19 pm
I am using Fungicide3.This is used on all roses, flowers, houseplants, ornamental trees and shrubs, fruits, nuts, and vegetables grown to and around the home and home garden. It is an effective fungicide for the prevention and control of various fungal disease including black spot on roses, powdery mildew, anthracnose, rust leaf spot, botrytis, needle rust, scab, and flower, twig and tip blight.


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