moosey
head gardener
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Mulch from Leyland Cypress Clippings

11 Apr '06 1:08 pm
Apart from the fragrance, and the acidity - what could go wrong if I spread shredded hedge trimmings from Leyland Cypress on my garden? At this stage I'm keeping it well away from plants, as it's pretty fresh. Anyone out there with any warnings?
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Dixie
garden enthusiast
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Waikato-New Zealand

conifer mulch

12 Apr '06 3:07 pm
Yes please --I would like to know too .Roses that I planted near felled conifers did not thrive. I do know that pine needles can be toxic as a mulch . Dairy Farmers know not to let cattle eat trimmings from cypress etc. as it causes them to lose their calves.
Dixie.

moosey
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Dixie - You're Back!

12 Apr '06 5:23 pm
Nothing much to add to this conifer-mulch concern of mine - just wanted to say hello! You're back!

Now back to the leyland mulch. The smell is rather lovely - reminds me of those things you can buy to clear your nose. Anyway, I've used it - it must be better than putting absolutely nothing on a garden! Mustn't it?

I have a friend who collects bags of pine needles to use as mulch. I tend to rake mine up. I always get loads of fungi underneath and near the pines - pinus radiata in particular. Perhaps the fungi has something to do with your rose problem?
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pumpkin
compost executive
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Dairy Flat, New Zealand

15 Apr '06 7:52 am
I have read nothing about the Leyland being a problem when used as a mulch, so can't really add anything except.... Dixie! you are back! :D

However the pine needles....it is true that nothing seems to grow under them, but then I'm pretty sure that they are the main ingredient in an organic weedkiller :shock:

moosey
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30 Apr '06 5:50 pm
I'm puttng the chippings slowly onto parts of the garden. So far nothing untoward has happened. They've changed colour, and now look like a pale brown leaf litter (that's viewing without my spectacles).

I thought I might scatter some blood-and-bone over to help them decompose. Naturally they will NOT be dug in! Wish me luck!
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Sjoerd
member
Hoorn, the Netherlands

19 May '06 11:05 am
Boy, Moosey...what I wouldn't give for those clippings to go under my blueberry bushes! They just LURVE acidity. Have you ever tested your soil's pH? It seems a good idea to know that before spreading the clippings. They have little kits for that. We have to keep an eye on out lottie's soil because it's veen ground and is; generally speaking, a bit acid. Our pH is 6 throughout this year.

Jack Holloway
Passionate Gardener
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SEQUOIA FARM Haenertsburg South Africa

Acid compost & mulch

23 May '06 10:02 pm
A bit belatedly, here's my opinion: we use plenty of pine mulch and also pine compost - scrapings from the floor of the pine plantations, available by the ton, when an acid growing medium is called for (and also, because it is so freely available, add it to other composts.) I've never heard of problems with laylandia clippings. We just avoid bluegum in our composts!

Mercuary
member

Re: Mulch from Leyland Cypress Clippings

31 Oct '14 1:21 am
I have a friend who collects bags of pine needles to use as mulch. I tend to rake mine up. I always get loads of fungi underneath and near the pines - pinus radiata in particular. Perhaps the fungi has something to do with your rose problem?
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MacFlax
member
Canberra, Australia

Imitation is the sincerest form of spammery?

31 Oct '14 2:48 am
Mercuary wrote:I have a friend who collects bags of pine needles to use as mulch. I tend to rake mine up. I always get loads of fungi underneath and near the pines - pinus radiata in particular. Perhaps the fungi has something to do with your rose problem?


Funny M e r c u a r y, so does the owner of this website! :lol:

moosey wrote: . . I have a friend who collects bags of pine needles to use as mulch. I tend to rake mine up. I always get loads of fungi underneath and near the pines - pinus radiata in particular. Perhaps the fungi has something to do with your rose problem?

moosey
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Re: Mulch from Leyland Cypress Clippings

5 Nov '14 8:06 am
OH boy. Why do they do this? Very funny when one is checking the forum on a wet non-gardening day.... Cheers, M
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