GardenGnome
Happily Toiling Away
User avatar
Regina, Saskatchewan

Idea for vegetables

9 Jun '06 8:38 pm
We came across this web page, I can't find it now, but it was all about growing vegetables in pots and planters. That's what we are going to do. I made a big planter and I will make another shortly. We bought the soil so we don't need to worry about our gumbo soil. Easy to plant. Easy to tend. Quick to get going. Can be moved.

Think about it.

Christopher
biggestplanter.jpg
This planter was made from old lumber. It will go in the back yard with vegetables growing in it.
treepot.jpg
You might find some old barrels like this. We bought this for $11.99. Vegetables could be grown in a pot like this with no trouble.
A Gnome's at home in his garden.

Sjoerd
member
Hoorn, the Netherlands

16 Jun '06 11:25 am
Hiya Bambi!
So how's it going with your garden plans?
I'm getting all excited for you and your veggie plans. I sure hope that things do settle down for you so that you can make a start this season, even if it's a small one.
Let us know when you are pretty close to breaking ground and I am sure that the folks on here will be more than happy to give you any guidence or advice that you require. If you are a novice at veggie gardening, there will be alot to learn, but it's ALL learnable and not complicated. In most cases when it comes to veggie gardening, it's logic that can be your guide along with your personal prerferences...and in terms of what will and what won't work in your garden--Mother Nature will give you her crash course there!..heh heh heh.
By and large it was my experience that veggie gardening is something that you learn bit by bit...and no one ever learns or knows everything. It's not like a curriculm at the Uni... there is no end to the learning.
My fingers are crossed for you...
Keep us updated with your progress...ok?
cheers...

Bambi
Slowly Learning Gardener
User avatar
Kent, England

20 Jun '06 1:30 am
Hi all,

Thanks again for all the advice - love the containers Christopher the Garden Gnome :-), I think that's a great idea, especially while I'm just getting started, because some of my beds aren't particularly wide so I was actually wondering what to do about them. Now I think I'll start in pots, then widen the beds when I can and that job won't hold up my veggie harvest!!

Sjoerd, thank you so much for your kind words! I have to admit, never having done this sort of thing on my own before, it is a little bit daunting, but knowing that I can visit Moosey's garden for a chat with all the lovely people here makes it that much easier :-)

I hope I'm not a total novice, though, because I did used to help my parents in the garden a lot when I was growing up. Mind you, it's been quite a long time so I may have forgotten everything I used to know, but I'm hoping it'll all come back to me in time!!

I think my main worry is that I'll try to do something but then find out it's the wrong time of year to do it or something. I know there's a kind of rule of when to plant, when to sow seeds, etc. but how much can you bend these rules?

Bambi
x
"If you'd have a mind at peace
A heart that cannot harden
Go find a door that opens wide
Upon a beautiful garden."
Author Unknown

Dixie
garden enthusiast
User avatar
Waikato-New Zealand

Time to plant ,time to sow

20 Jun '06 7:36 am
Often in weekly newspapers there is a garden section on 'what to do this week ' - very helpful to those of us who find out we really should have planted seeds a month ago , and now have to buy plants !
Do have a look at Sjoerd`s website ,as they have sections that tell you when to plant certain things ,and prune etc. Would Holland and England have similar climate conditions ?
Dixie.

Sjoerd
member
Hoorn, the Netherlands

20 Jun '06 11:32 am
Hiya Bambi!
You talked about being a novice...but I'll tell you one thing...one never knows it all and gardening is an ongoing learning process with successes and failures with such wildcard factors as weather just to trip you up. Heh heh.
Planting things: If you start your plants from seed, then planting times and setting-out times will be on the back of the seed packs...and in the case of vegetable seeds, so will the harvesting time.
One tip that we employ is the keeping of a little black book. In this book we write down seeding dates, setting-out dates, first sign of fruit/veggie dates and harvesting dates.
We make it an ongoing book(like a small agenda-type book) and do it each year, cos it's helpful as a reminder and guide.
We keep this book in the "Garden Bag". This bag goes with us every time we go to the lottie, and gets brought back home - this way it is always at hand. An easy access reference source.
It's sometimes a hassel to remember to write things down after a long day of garden work, but has prooved worth it's weight in gold more than once.
Good luck, Bambi. We are all ready and willing to assist whenever and however we can.
p.s. The weather here is more or less the same as in England. The weather in Essex is slightly warmer and usually a bit ahead of ours here in Hoorn, and the weather in Nofolk is almost identical...if that gives you an idea.

Bambi
Slowly Learning Gardener
User avatar
Kent, England

27 Jun '06 9:16 pm
Thanks for the advice Sjoerd - the little black vegetable book sounds like a great idea and, in fact, I have a slight reputation at work for being a geek (which I'm actually quite proud of!! :-)) because of my love of lists and charts, so I think that it'll suit me down to the ground.

Dixie, I had a look at Sjoerd's web site as you suggested and I think it's great - I'll definitely be visiting again to pick up on the latest tips, etc.

Now that summer's here properly (apart from the torrential rain yesterday, but I mustn't complain coz it's all good for the plants!!), my garden isn't looking quite the weed-infested patch it does at other times of the year as everything's starting to burst into flower. Here are a few photos of some flowering beauties; I'm not sure exactly what a couple of them are, but they look nice anyway ;-) If any of them are horrendous weeds or poisonous to cats, though, I probably should pull them up I suppose :-)
DSCF0030a.JPG
These two only lasted a few days, but there are more coming on further along the wall. My mum thinks it's a clematis but I'm not sure what kind.
DSCF0035a.JPG
My fuschias are looking lovely, adding a splash of red and purple to things
DSCF0036a.JPG
There are about four or five of these which seem to have seeded themselves around the garden - I don't know what they are but the flowers are nice.
DSCF0037a.JPG
My lone delphinium - only one has come up but that's better than none!!
DSCF0039a.JPG
Don't know what these are either!
DSCF0040a.JPG
There are about three of these dotted around but again, I don't know their name (lots of gaps in my knowledge obviously!)
DSCF0042a.JPG
Lastly, these are a mystery too but quite unusual I think.
"If you'd have a mind at peace
A heart that cannot harden
Go find a door that opens wide
Upon a beautiful garden."
Author Unknown

Sjoerd
member
Hoorn, the Netherlands

28 Jun '06 12:20 pm
Hello There, Miss...
I can identify a few of these I believe, because I have them in my flower garden as well.
#42a - Nigella
#40a - Lychnis coronaria
#39a looks like a campanula sort, although I have serious doubts. There is another plant in my mind, but I just can't think of it's name at the moment
#36a Looks an awful lot like a Hypericum.
You have some nice plowers there, Bambi. Do you have more fotos? :)
Last edited by Sjoerd on 30 Jun '06 8:42 pm, edited 4 times in total.

jacqueline
Thankful Gardener
User avatar
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

30 Jun '06 6:13 pm
Hi Bambi, your flowers are beautiful! Love the fuschias and the most outstanding of all for me is the last one, simply intriguing, love its artistic display and contrast of white sandwiched between greens! Thanks for sharing.

Bambi
Slowly Learning Gardener
User avatar
Kent, England

30 Jun '06 8:36 pm
Hi Jaqueline,

Yes, I thought that flower was quite striking too. When Sjoerd told me its name I looked it up and apparently the seed pods are quite often used in things like flower arranging and stuff because they add structure. Some of the pods are coming through now so I'll take some piccies of them and post them in a day or two. :)
"If you'd have a mind at peace
A heart that cannot harden
Go find a door that opens wide
Upon a beautiful garden."
Author Unknown

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