My Daily Journey


Bambi
Slowly Learning Gardener
User avatar
Kent, England

My Daily Journey

24 Oct '07 2:38 am
Ok, so I promised this last week and I’m only now posting it, but hopefully it’s worth the wait! Or maybe you’ll think it’s really boring, but I thought it was a nice idea to see the daily journeys each of us make and thought I’d sort of start things off (apart from Faerisweet’s one a few weeks ago).

As you can tell, it was a rather miserable, rainy morning when I took the photos, and you’ll have to forgive the fact that most of them are blurred – had a problem with lack of light and trying to take photos through the windscreen (I didn’t want to get wet, you know!). This may be quite a nice exercise to do in the different seasons. Anyway, here’s my journey to work every day…
Journey to Work 1.JPG
This one’s right at the beginning – I’ve just turned out of my road and am about to go down the first hill.
Journey to Work 2.JPG
This is at the bottom of the hill approaching the T-junction where I turn left. Opposite is the village green (I call it that, but you can’t really call where I live a village as it’s been swallowed up by the neighbouring town!).
Journey to Work 3.JPG
This is approaching the neighbouring village (this one actually is!), quaintly called Pratts Bottom, and you can just about see the church spire on the left.
Journey to Work 4.JPG
This one is ascending the second hill – this canopy of trees is gorgeous when the leaves turn gold and also when they’re covered in snow.
Journey to Work 5.JPG
You can just about see the view over the other side of this hill, looking down towards Sevenoaks town, where I grew up.
Journey to Work 6.JPG
You wouldn’t believe it, but this road runs parallel to the M25 – scourge of all south-eastern English motorists!
Journey to Work 7.JPG
And here it is (well, sort of!) Had to take this one really quickly as I was being followed!
Journey to Work 8.JPG
Just crossed the bridge over the M25 and it’s all green again!
Journey to Work 9.JPG
This one was taken in a village called Brasted – a typically English place with lots of tea rooms, antiques shops and zero parking spaces!
Journey to Work 10.JPG
The other end of the same village and just past this, you enter the town where I work, Westerham, but I couldn’t get a decent picture on the approach – sorry!
DSCF0324.JPG
Ok, Ok, I know this isn’t of my journey to work, but I just had to include it as I think it’s SOOO cute! Just look at the spoilt little wotsits, with their own special towel to lie on!
"If you'd have a mind at peace
A heart that cannot harden
Go find a door that opens wide
Upon a beautiful garden."
Author Unknown

faerisweet
member
User avatar
Poolville,Texas

daily journey

25 Oct '07 5:45 pm
I loved seeing a little of your world. I would love to travel but finances and children prevent too much of that right now. You live in a beautiful area, it seems like a nice trip to work every morning. I especially like #4 and the ones of the village. I really like this idea of yours.
Image

Bambi
Slowly Learning Gardener
User avatar
Kent, England

26 Oct '07 2:40 am
Hi Faerisweet,

Thanks for your comments. Yes, the part of the journey shown in photo no. 4 is particularly nice and, in fact, the whole journey is quite pleasant - I know I could never commute into London which a lot of people who live in our area do (and hubby used to up until a couple of years ago) and have huge respect for them, but it would drive me mad, not seeing any green around me all day, plus the trains are always late, dirty, crowded, etc. etc! :roll: :D
"If you'd have a mind at peace
A heart that cannot harden
Go find a door that opens wide
Upon a beautiful garden."
Author Unknown

Jack Holloway
Passionate Gardener
User avatar
SEQUOIA FARM Haenertsburg South Africa

Soul places

26 Oct '07 7:35 pm
Bambi! How I enjoyed your trip - all the more as your area is SOO familiar to me. In 1995, when I spent 6 months in Europe in a camper, I thought of Sevenoaks as a home base. Great Dixter and Sissinghurst I visited in three seasons, and many of the gardens around there were highlights of my tour. After coming through the chunnel on the vehicle train at 3am (cheapest rates!)in early October, we stopped on the village green in Sevenoaks and waited for the shops to open. At first light I was out collecting seed from the oaks, and many of my trees must have germinated from those very seeds: I enclose a pic I've just taken from my house of an avenue at the edge of the meadow of these trees.

Your no 4 is to me the quintessential English scene. When I first arrived in mid-May I hired a car - a tiny little Fiat but it had a glass roof - and travelled down to Leonardslee to catch the end of the azaleas. I have never felt as free in my life as I did then, travelling down just such lanes, knowing that I had six glorious months of exploring ahead of me.

Then four years ago my friend Johann, an Afrikaans boy, but after 5 odd years in London an Englishman, took me on his 'how to avoid the traffic' route from Gatwick where he worked as an architect to the area near London airport where he then lived. We stopped for walks along public footpaths, detoured to see picturesque villages or compositions of fields and hedgerows, and at one point I said to him: 'You do realise that you will never be happy to return to Africa permanently. This has become part of your blood.'

I think your idea of this post is a brilliant one, and I've written an encouragement for others to join you on the chat page. I will be working on something, using old and new pics. No deadline though, please!
Five oaks from Sevenoaks.JPG

Bambi
Slowly Learning Gardener
User avatar
Kent, England

27 Oct '07 1:56 am
Wow, Jack, I had no idea you knew Sevenoaks so well :shock: - it is, and always has been, my true home. You see, I grew up in Sevenoaks, from the age of 4 until just before I was married at 22! I, too, have experienced dawn in Sevenoaks (after all-night teenage parties!) and it really is magical on the green, or The Vine, as it is named (presuming you mean where the cricket ground is, and the seven oaks of Sevenoaks are). Speaking of which, you were there only nine years after the Great Storm (as we call it) and must have seen the five new oaks which they planted to replace the ones that were lost. It's so wonderful that you have trees descended from these, and what a wonderful idea you've given me: when we eventuall move away, I must gather some acorns from the seven oaks and take them with me so I'll always have a bit of the place where I spent my childhood with me! :D

The area around is great too - there are so many gardens and country walks to choose from but, sadly, time is something that just isn't at my disposal :( but I have promised myself a trip to Sissinghurst in the spring, hopefully in time to catch that glorious wisteria you told us about a few weeks ago :)
"If you'd have a mind at peace
A heart that cannot harden
Go find a door that opens wide
Upon a beautiful garden."
Author Unknown

Faith S
Perpetually learning gardener
User avatar
Alabama, USA

Beautiful journey

27 Oct '07 4:01 am
Dear Bambi, you are truly blessed with a beautiful drive to work. I enjoyed your photos tremendously, but must admit that the ones through the wind screen made me a little nervous. You were on the wrong side of the road! Just kidding of course. But I was a little puzzled with the zigzag lines on the pavement in your no.10 photo. What was that all about?

I do hope you will do this again in another season because I agree that this would be very interesting. And I will be looking forward to Jack's post when he finally gets it together.

A great idea!
Faith at Bide-a-Wee Farm, Alabama, USA

Come abide with me a wee while.

Bambi
Slowly Learning Gardener
User avatar
Kent, England

27 Oct '07 11:45 pm
Hi Faith,

Yes it is a pleasant journey - in fact, I actually go a slightly longer way around in order to have that nice journey! I could go a shorter route, but it's not as nice!! :D

Hee hee, I hadn't thought about the "driving on the other side of the road" thing! The zig zags on the road are to indicate a zebra crossing - they're painted on either side of the crossing and you're not allowed to park on them, that's all.
"If you'd have a mind at peace
A heart that cannot harden
Go find a door that opens wide
Upon a beautiful garden."
Author Unknown

Faith S
Perpetually learning gardener
User avatar
Alabama, USA

Zebra crossing

28 Oct '07 1:33 am
Well, someone should have told those people who put up the buildings along both sides. How do the Zebra get through? :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Faith at Bide-a-Wee Farm, Alabama, USA

Come abide with me a wee while.

gordonf
Happy Collector
User avatar
Lillooet, BC, Canada

"Off to Work" Pictures

28 Oct '07 4:47 pm
Hi, Bambi-

I think this idea of yours is a great one!! I really enjoyed seeing more of the area where you live and work - it's quite unlike anything here. For example, instead of zebra stripes, we use a red edge on the sidewalks to indicate "No Parking".

I think I'll work up a series of pictures of my route into town for my daily shopping, since I don't work anymore. I wonder if we need another thread devoted to these pictures?

Cheers!

gordonf


Return to Garden Tours



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron