Chanticleer Garden


Mark
Home gardener & plant fetishist
User avatar
Berkeley, California, USA

Chanticleer Garden

5 Apr '07 1:13 pm
Here are some photos of one of my very favorite gardens. It is a 33-acre estate garden outside of Philadelphia, PA, USA. The fellow who lived here last, Adolph Rosengarten Jr., died in 1990 but not before setting up a foundation to maintain and operate the garden for the enjoyment of the public. It is unusual in two respects. First he did not insist that it be maintained as it was and second he left the foundation a lot of money. As a result this is one of the best maintained gardens you'll ever see and it is constantly being reinvented to incorporate new plants and design ideas. They also commission a good deal of art for the garden.

I've only been there once in the summer of 2005 but I definitely will return as often as I can get there. I hope you enjoy the photos. (It looks as if I might finally have figured out how to load photos here at Moosey's, YAY!)
-Mark

About the photos: #'s 13 to 9 are from the "Ruins garden" developed on the foundations of one of the older buildings on the estate. (Clearly these 'ruins' have been enhanced if not replaced altogether.) One of my favorite parts of the garden.

#'s 7 and 8 are taken along the path leading up to the Ruins garden.

#'s 6 and 5 are taken near one of the houses on the property while #0 was taken of one of the borders surrounding the house you pass when entering the garden.

#'s 1 to 4 are of the Tennis Court garden, developed in the footprint of -you guessed it- the old tennis court.
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Faith S
Perpetually learning gardener
User avatar
Alabama, USA

Chanticleer

5 Apr '07 2:31 pm
Lovely pictures Mark. Thanks for the tour. I particularly liked the 'Sky Pencil' ilex grouping in pictures 10 and 11 in the "ruins garden". Like little soldiers all lined up in formation.

This garden reminded me a little of the gardens at Filoli. Have you been there? It is about 30 miles south of San Francisco. If not, you should definitely visit. It was built between 1915 and 1917 by William Bowers Bourn II. The name was chosen because of his favorite credo: Fight for a just cause, love your fellow man, live a good life. Or FIght LOve LIve.
Faith at Bide-a-Wee Farm, Alabama, USA

Come abide with me a wee while.

Mark
Home gardener & plant fetishist
User avatar
Berkeley, California, USA

Hi Faith,

5 Apr '07 2:54 pm
I hadn't even noticed the 'Sky pencils' until you pointed it out to me. Thanks. I have been to Filoli but it was in the middle of summer and I hear Spring is the season of choice there. I think you have inspired me to bring my wife there before the week is out. She hasn't been yet. Maybe tomorrow morning.

I can't tell you how liberating it feels to finally have figured out how to post on Moosey's. The trick for me was to adjust the photo file size for those that were too big at the point where you export them.

Would asking you how preparations go for your tour be distressing for you? I just hope you are content with what you are able to do under the circumstances. Please do tell me your knee is healing.

We'll be doing our Garden/Studio party next month on Saturday the 19th of May. That is later than we've done it in the past. I have a little concern that the roses will have exhausted themselves by then and start taking it easy. Mother's day has been the day we usually do this.
Mark in California

Q: "Do you ever sit down?"
A: "All the time until the urge to 'play' some more becomes too strong."

Faith S
Perpetually learning gardener
User avatar
Alabama, USA

5 Apr '07 3:01 pm
Thanks Mark. The knee is healing very well now. No limp. I am able to do almost anything except kneel for long periods. Things are coming along nicely for the tour. Good luck with your studio tour. I am sure it will be lovely even if the roses are resting a little. I found my old pictures of Filoli, so I will do a post.
Faith at Bide-a-Wee Farm, Alabama, USA

Come abide with me a wee while.

Dixie
garden enthusiast
User avatar
Waikato-New Zealand

gardens

5 Apr '07 7:36 pm
Chanticleer (rooster ?) The soft muted colour scheme is so unusual -it would take remarkable restraint to be so disciplined ,but I love it .The old ruins are a particularly serene place to wander .
Dixie.

Mark
Home gardener & plant fetishist
User avatar
Berkeley, California, USA

Hi Dixie

6 Apr '07 2:44 am
You're right. The garden is named for a rooster in a famous book or story, but which one escapes me at the moment. I'll bet you know it. "A Travelor's Tale" keeps coming to mind but seems wrong.

The colors really are muted in places, especially the one numbered 6. I think that big bromeliad is so impressive surrounded by those similarly colored plants. Very pastel and silvery.

They do get winter snow so I was surprised by the number of exotic plants they incorporate into so many plantings. Below the ruins is another area which is boggy and covered in carnivorous pitcher plants. I'll try and post it for you.

pitcher 2.jpg
Field of pitcher plants at Chanticleer.
Mark in California

Q: "Do you ever sit down?"
A: "All the time until the urge to 'play' some more becomes too strong."

Dixie
garden enthusiast
User avatar
Waikato-New Zealand

Rooster

6 Apr '07 6:54 am
Chanticleer -the fictional rooster from 'Reynard the Fox' - only vaguely remembered .Why would he name his garden that ,though it has a musical ring to it .
Dixie

Anna
Gone to seed
User avatar
Hamilton, New Zealand

9 Apr '07 1:03 pm
Thoroughly enjoyed the photos. My favourite was the last one before the pitcher plants. It has a nice 'rambly' quality to it. :)

And I wouldn't say no to some of those 'ruins' in my garden. Quite lovely they are.
Woof?

Mark
Home gardener & plant fetishist
User avatar
Berkeley, California, USA

Glad you liked the show Anna

9 Apr '07 2:11 pm
First let me just tell Dixie that I am going to find the answer to the "why name it that" question. I know I picked up a little guide book there and there was something about it. I was rushing through it but I didn't find the answer at their website.

There are a lot of different parts to that garden which have different 'feels'. I like the work "rambly" by the way to describe the part of the garden leading away down the hill from the main ruins. (It kind of describes that last sentence of mine too.) I don't go in for a lot of artwork in the garden but they do and they have loads of it, several by Marsha Donahue including that giant head laying in the grass.

Marsha Donahue lives in Berkeley and has her garden open every Sunday. Her plant choices are tremendous and she gardens in an impossibly small space. If anyone ever comes out this way you should definitely see it. I'll try to get around to taking some photographs in the mean time.

Talking about favorite gardens my all time favorite is in a small town just north of here and was built by Harland Hand. He died and the garden is privately owned but is sometimes opened for groups. It has been maintained beautifully. I've been several times but haven't yet taken any photos (still new to photography). To see it on line you can go to:

www.harlandhandgarden.com/

The website for the Chanticleer garden is:

www.chanticleergarden.org/
Mark in California

Q: "Do you ever sit down?"
A: "All the time until the urge to 'play' some more becomes too strong."


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