Candids Place


gordonf
Happy Collector
User avatar
Lillooet, BC, Canada

Re: Candids Place

6 Jul '11 8:35 pm
Thanks for the info. That table was a lot of work, eh? But worth it, I'm sure!!

Cheers!

gordonf

SusanB
honoured contributor
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Re: Candids Place

6 Jul '11 10:13 pm
Oh my goodness, your table turned out gorgeoussss!!!! =D> =D> I bet you were just tickled pink and purple to stand back and look at that finished work of art when you were all done! Absolutely beautiful, and such a wonderful collection of colours! Also a great shot of the "silvereyes", what cute little faces they have!
There can be no other occupation like gardening
in which, if you were to creep up behind
someone at their work, you would find them smiling.
~ Mirabel Osler

Kerole
A Gardener of Disrepair
User avatar
Taupaki, New Zealand

Re: Candids Place

7 Jul '11 4:35 pm
Crikey Candid your bird pics are wonderful. So nice to see natives in the garden.

Your garden's coming together nicely.

candid
valued helper
Otane, Central Hawkes Bay, New Zealand

Re: Candids Place

5 Aug '11 1:36 pm
Hi Everyone
I have decided that no self respecting cottage garden should be without a garden gate arch, the man of the house is dutifully outside as I speak constructing the new feature :) . Me, well I am in a bit of a 'not sure mode' as to what I want to have climbing over this structure, will it be roses, wisteria, honeysuckle, clematis :?
If I choose a rose what one :?: I have cresp!!! you know the one that has a name that sounds like a skin disease, but very beautiful, Ah! I say what about a 'pink' one, but here comes the inevitable question, which one do I choose...perhaps Moosey can help, obviously I want something that is not going to attack my visitors when they come through the gate. I have never had a wisteria so not sure whether it will be ok in this situation and clematis seem a bit tricky in this neck of the woods, so the other option is honeysuckle but again what kind, is there a semi evergreen one that grows well here in NZ. Well thats my 'rambling' for the moment, look forward to suggestions.

gordonf
Happy Collector
User avatar
Lillooet, BC, Canada

Re: Candids Place

5 Aug '11 5:51 pm
Hi! Have you ever thought of a trumpet vine? There are orangey-red and yellow varieties, as far as I know. They like lots of sunshine and have no thorns. Mine hasn't bloomed yet, but when they do bloom, it's in mid-to-late summer. They also have no thorns. Maybe combining a trumpet vine with an earlier clematis would work for you.

Failing that, I'd recommend the rose, Dortmund", which is a semi-double red rose with light centres and a reasonable perfume. If deadheaded, it reblooms all summer, even into fall. Also, for me at least, it rarely gets black spot.

Check my garden diary for pics of it.

-gordonf

Kerole
A Gardener of Disrepair
User avatar
Taupaki, New Zealand

Re: Candids Place

6 Aug '11 9:39 am
Oooh MORE garden structures... I'm incredibly jealous! I can't seem to erect the first of a gazillion garden structures that are on the list of 'things I really really want help with'. What's your bloke doing this weekend? :D

Now then climbing things for your new arch... It all kinda depends on the size of the arch (how much headroom) and it's position (how much sun).

Although a quintessential cottage favourite, Wisteria will swallow the arch and engulf the house before you can google how to prune it properly. It grows into a creeper with a trunk and branches like a tree. Not for your lovely new arch.

Honeysuckle - Noooooo! For much the same reasons as given for wisteria minus the trunk bit. Common Honeysuckle is on the NZ naughty plant list so it would be imprudent to plant this. There are lovely hybrids available in shades of muted lemons and apricots. Gorgeous things but I'm terrified that when I'm sleeping it'll be off raping and pillaging my garden. BUT... I saw a very neat idea on TV that I am absolutely going to try. Standardising the honeysuckle so it has a straight 'trunk' and a cloud of viney bits arching from the top. Kept under the ever watchful eye of a sharpened pair of pruners, the scented flowers could be enjoyed safe in the knowledge the plant is unlikely to run away in the middle of the night.

Clematis - I have a weird fascination with these plants but you are right they are steeped in mystery when it comes to growing them well. As a result I view those that have gorgeous flowering hybrids cascading over walls and entwining with roses as gardeners with some kind of magical powers. But I am going to have a go this year. A Naiobi (deep velvety black-red) is planned for near the pond. But I digress... Yes clematis would be a lovely choice, but do not get one of the Montana types. Don't be sucked into the blurb that says robust, evergreen, and carefree. What they really mean is this plant will grow at an alarming rate and become a menace to your neigbours. Think Old Man's Beard with pretty flowers. The decidous, winter dormant hybrids are trickier to grow but are SO incredibly beautiful (particualrly as they come in shades of that rare flower comodity, true blue). They have weak-looking flimsy tendrils so your arch is not at risk at being swallowed whole, but alone they look a bit sparse.

Roses - I give this idea two thumbs up! I sympathise with the 'what to choose' sentiment too! I have just made the difficult decision to plant a pair of Graham Thomas' in the front gardens. I would usually choose something a little different and less obvious but when it came down to it GT ticked all the boxes so why argue? To narrow it down you need to fill in a rose questionaire and THEN ask for assistance...

1. Colour?
2. Form. Do you like long-budded modern types, flat simple singles, or tight cabbagy old fashioned ones?
3. Fragrance? Personally I think all roses should be as smelly as possibly but that's not everyone's cup of tea.
4. Flowers all season or one big blowout in late spring?

Try to avoid a rambler or any overly vigorous climbers. If you grow a blue clematis (maybe Kiri Te Kanawa) through an old fashioned pale pinky or lemony rose I will be eternally jealous!

And then of course there are other vine choices such as Star Jasmine and trumpet vines and Thunbergias...

candid
valued helper
Otane, Central Hawkes Bay, New Zealand

Re: Candids Place

6 Aug '11 10:46 am
Hi Kerole, it's a real problem when one is so undecided as to what to plant where, your right roses do seem to be the obvious choice, the gateway arch is in full sun and has good headroom, I would like an old fashioned one with lots of small clusters of blooms and of course very fragrant...I am going to D&S Roses this afternoon they have one named Lamarque, a noisette lemon/white and not many thorns, not sure if it's what I really want. Still not sure about the clematis, my neighbour has quite a few, his are not so exposed and we had hell of a frost this morning and the area by the gate cops it bad. Given my bloke the day off today :lol:

Kerole
A Gardener of Disrepair
User avatar
Taupaki, New Zealand

Re: Candids Place

6 Aug '11 12:47 pm
Lamarque is lovely but it grows to 20m. Quite a lot of rose for your buck! Also, ask them if it flowers all summer or only once.

Climbing Cecile Brunner would be pretty high on my list for your arch. I'm not a mad-keen pink person but I adore this rose. It has very small delicate pale pink double flowers on sprays all over the plant. The buds are so perfect they look like a painting. The foliage is mid-dark green and nearly thornless. It looks fragile but it's as tough as old boots. It will carry on being gorgeous regardless of how much attention it gets.

gordonf
Happy Collector
User avatar
Lillooet, BC, Canada

Re: Candids Place

6 Aug '11 2:09 pm
Hi, Candid,

I must rescind one of my recommendations of yesterday. I just discovered on another gardening website that in many southern climates, trumpet vine is very invasive, seeding all over and very hard to eradicate! Who knew?? Around here, it's very well behaved, even hard to grow. But check carefully as to what its behaviour is in your area before planting it.

Cheers!

gordonf

candid
valued helper
Otane, Central Hawkes Bay, New Zealand

Re: Candids Place

3 Nov '11 10:47 am
Hi Everyone
What a great month October has been for growth in the garden, everything is growing like topsy.
The new gardens planted in the Autumn are coming on well, not a lot of flowers yet, plenty of poppies though, but the roses are budding up nicely and the irises put on a lovely display last month.
Here are some pics of the gardens progress.
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Rose garden
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