Hi - I'm new here


floss
helper

Hi - I'm new here

30 Aug '08 1:21 am
Hi everyone, I heard about this site from the Turning Earth website in the UK (well worth a look). I've been reading Moosey's site for a couple of days (and loving it) and decided to join you all here and say hello.

I live in Luton in the UK and am an avid gardener, though sadly part-time.

I've loved reading the site but am having trouble getting my head around the fact that your August is the start of spring, whereas we are facing the end of our garden season soon and nights are drawing in fast. Just like you though, we have had a dismally wet August!

I've added your site to my Favourites and can't wait to hear more.

MacFlax
member
Canberra, Australia

Hello from Australia

30 Aug '08 2:05 am
Hi Floss, nice to meet you. :)
Temps are starting to creep up here, we're hoping for 17℃ 62℉ tomorrow but the nights are still freezing. I'm afraid I'm not a keen winter gardener. I really envy Moosey in that regard! The weeds have well and truly woken up and my husband went out to deal with them today but I decided to wait till we get just a little warmer.
I had a quick look at the website you mentioned and bookmarked it to have a browse later (it's midnight here).

GardenGnome
Happily Toiling Away
User avatar
Regina, Saskatchewan

Hello from Canada

30 Aug '08 7:38 am
Welcome to our little corner of cyberspace. I'm looking forward to seeing photos of your garden.

Christopher
A Gnome's at home in his garden.

Dixie
garden enthusiast
User avatar
Waikato-New Zealand

welcome

30 Aug '08 9:19 am
Welcome-from Australia,Canada,and now New Zealand.
The good thing about the northern and southern hemisphere gardening seasons is that on this site,on a dismal,foggy,glum,gloomy and blah winter's day here,I can be cheered and inspired by what someone 'up there' has achieved in a summer garden.
Cheers
Dixie.
(PS-I will have a look at the site you mentioned)

moosey
head gardener
User avatar

Welcome

30 Aug '08 6:38 pm
Great to meet you! I know about the season-thing. It never ever ceases to amaze me, particularly when I travel. It takes me 26 hours to get into a British summer from a New Zealand winter. It's really one of the amazing things about our gardening world, I reckon.

I've had two great spring-like days in the garden. It was so nice to come in after six hours today and find a message from a new person in the forum. I hope you'll visit lots!
Cheers, M
Head Gardener
mooseyscountrygarden.com
http://www.mooseyscountrygarden.com

jack two
member
User avatar
The new improved Jack Holloway v.2

Hi Floss

31 Aug '08 12:09 pm
And welcome from South Africa, where spring is springing too!

Mark
Home gardener & plant fetishist
User avatar
Berkeley, California, USA

Welcome from California, Floss

1 Sep '08 1:56 pm
Boy we'd take some of that extra rainfall I've been hearing about in a heartbeat. It hasn't rained here since last spring and we're on water restrictions. Tough love time for the garden. I'm going to head over to that other site for a quick look but then I'd better go walk the dogs. (You should see the looks they're giving me.)
Mark in California

Q: "Do you ever sit down?"
A: "All the time until the urge to 'play' some more becomes too strong."

floss
helper

Thank you

13 Sep '08 2:51 am
Thanks for your message - not had time to even look at this site to see whether anyone replied to my message.

Sorry to hear about your water restrictions over there. I had no idea things were so bad over in California. I guess we're too envious of the sun/sand/surf culture you seem to have, to realise it would actually be a huge problem. We had restrictions in 2006 (hard to believe now!) but the last two years have been awful with people dying in floods (6 last weekend) and still unable to go back to their homes since last year.

I'm hoping the weekend will be clear so that I can cut my privet hedge for the final time this year and do some dead-heading. Also want to clear some brambles out back which will annoy all of the cats who come and sleep in my garden.

One thing I wanted to ask - could you tell me how the zones work in US gardening? I understand it relates to area and frost hardiness - is that right?

Thanks,

Floss

Mark
Home gardener & plant fetishist
User avatar
Berkeley, California, USA

15 Sep '08 3:26 am
I have been hearing about all the rain you've been getting in the UK. I hadn't realized you were getting flooding as well. In the winter, our wet season, it is often slightly warmer on days that we get rain. I wonder if that is true for you as well. Of course it is still summer and having just come back from the south of England last month I know summer days can be pretty warm. I don't believe there were any days when we were uncomfortably warm though.

You asked about our climate zones. The most used system is the one put out by U.S.D.A., U. S. Department of Agriculture. That one is based on the average lowest temperature a region receives each year. By that system, I'm in zone 9. In the last twenty years the lowest recorded temperatures in my area ranged from 36 to 23 F. The lowest temperature ever recorded here was 20 F.

A newer measure is given by the A.H.S., American Horticultural Society. Theirs is a measure of the yearly average number of hot days over 86 F (30 C). On their scale we're in zone 2, averaging 1 to 8 hot days. But our average summer temperatures range from 60 to 75 F and the hottest day on record was 97 F. (In nearby areas further inland the hottest days on record range from 104 to 116 F.)

But the climate zones we use the most around here is put out by the publishers of the Sunset Western Garden Book, our gardening bible. It gives the growing requirements of thousands of plants. They use a system which they say takes into account both the highest highs and lowest lows as well as elevation, rainfall, proximity to the coast, humidity and aridity. By that system I live in Sunset zone 17, the same as San Francisco.

Our place sits back about a mile from the bay. We're in the area of Berkeley known as the 'flats'. There start to be a few more bumps in the landscape in the next half mile and then you get into the hills, part of the coastal range. There is no discernable change in elevation in our neighborhood though we're about 80 feet higher than the bay.

Well I'll bet that's a fair bit more than you needed to know. What zoning system do you use in the UK?
Mark in California

Q: "Do you ever sit down?"
A: "All the time until the urge to 'play' some more becomes too strong."


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